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The Waverly in Greenwich Village: Review and Ratings | CityRealty

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Carter Horsley
Review by Carter Horsley
Carter Horsley Carter B. Horsley, a former journalist for The New York Times, The International Herald Tribune and The New York Post. Mr. Horsley is also the editorial director of CityRealty.com.
 

This handsome 16-story apartment building at 136 Waverly Place was erected in 1928 and contains 76 cooperative apartments.

It is known as The Waverly and is also known as 375-379 Sixth Avenue.

It was built by the Citadel Construction Company of which Charles Newmark was president.

It has a 24-hour doorman, 9-foot-high beamed ceilings, a bicycle room, protruding air-conditioners, a live-in superintendent and some wood-burning fireplaces.

It is one of the larger apartment buildings in Greenwich Village and is notable for its attractive, arched, rooftop watertank enclosure whose tall, narrow arches are repeated in the peaked roofline.

The beige-brick building is also distinguished by its unusual quoins and two different styles of spandrels and by its very ornate, two-story, canopied entrance surround and two-story rusticated base.

The building has a central Greenwich Village location, very close to Washington Square Park and to public transportation.

It has no garage and no balconies and no sidewalk landscaping.

An article by Max Abelson in the December 18, 2007 edition of the observer.com said that in December 2007 Wayne Correia sold his eight-room penthouse with a wood-burning fireplace, a 26-by-24-foot living room and a 2,550-square-foot terrace in the building for $8.7 million to David Whitcomb, a professor emeritus at Rutgers University. Mr. Correia had been head of a tech company known as Critical Path.

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