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A blog from CityRealty (Links below will take you to the 6sqft site)

7 Bond Street: Review and Ratings

Carter Horsley
Review of 7 Bond Street by Carter Horsley
Carter Horsley Carter B. Horsley, a former journalist for The New York Times, The International Herald Tribune and The New York Post. Mr. Horsley is also the editorial director of CityRealty.com.
 

Almost every neighborhood in Manhattan has a wild assortment of buildings and architectural styles, some of which are fascinating and/or awesome. Rarer, but still to be found, are the charmers, those buildings you just want to adopt and this pair of cast-iron buildings that are painted squeaky bright white and just the ticket. While they may not be the most distinguished or interesting examples of cast-iron architecture in the SoHo and NoHo districts, their "Mr. Clean" paint job and loving care have made them very prominent in this very busy, bustling, lively and central location.

Built in 1904 and converted to condominiums in 1986, the six-story buildings have a total of 20 apartments. The building's four middle floors have very large, well-proportioned windows and the top floor has fine mansard detailing that gives these buildings a French flavor.

This area is close to Tower Records, the New York Public Theater, many well-known clubs and restaurants and art galleries and a subway station.

The building has no garage, no health club, no balconies and no garage, but high ceilings.

These buildings are just to the east of 1-5 Bond Street, similar but slightly larger cast-iron structures in the Second Empire mansard style that were erected in 1880 and designed by Stephen D. Hatch as the Robbins & Appleton Building for a company that made watch cases. Together they form a fine ensemble.

Carter B. Horsley

Rating

16
Out of 44

Architecture Rating: 16 / 44

+
18
Out of 36

Location Rating: 18 / 36

+
12
Out of 39

Features Rating: 12 / 39

=
46

CityRealty Rating Reference

 
Architecture
  • 30+ remarkable
  • 20-29 distinguished
  • 11-19 average
  • < 11 below average
 
Location
  • 27+ remarkable
  • 18-26 distinguished
  • 9-17 average
  • < 9 below average
 
Features
  • 22+ remarkable
  • 16-21 distinguished
  • 9-15 average
  • < 9 below average
  • #21 Rated condo - NoHo
 
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The Woolworth Tower Residences
between Broadway & Church Street
Tribeca
The Reimagining of Tribeca’s Most Iconic Tower is Now Complete. Award-winning restoration with homes by Thierry W Despont. Immediate Occupancy.
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