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A blog from CityRealty (Links below will take you to the 6sqft site)

1 York Street in Tribeca: Review and Ratings | CityRealty

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Carter Horsley
Review by Carter Horsley
Carter Horsley Carter B. Horsley, a former journalist for The New York Times, The International Herald Tribune and The New York Post. Mr. Horsley is also the editorial director of CityRealty.com.
 

In 2005, the Museum of the City of New York had an exhibition on TEN Arquitectos, a well-known Mexican architectural firm headed by Enrique Norten, and three of its new projects in New York City, of which this building at 1 York Street in the northern part of TriBeCa was one.

The other two projects were a new Brooklyn Public Library for the Visual and Performing Arts, and Harlem Park, a 380-ft.-high, mixed-use project with an undulating façade on 125th Street and Park Avenue. Those two projects unfortunately were not built.

Mr. Norten subsequently designed a commercial tower in the jewelry district that was built.

This handsome project, which has 40 condominium apartments and community space for the Chinese American Planning Council, has a very visible site in the north part of TriBeCa.

The project consists of an existing 6-story structure bounded by York, Canal and Laight Streets, the Avenue of the Americas and St. John's Place, to which 6 setback stories have been added.

Stanley Perelman of JANI Real Estate was the developer.

Bottom Line

A very handsome, mid-rise, residential building in TriBeCa at Canal Street with an angled glass tower flanked by two low-rise, white-brick wings.

Description

The lower base of the building has been reclad but retains much of its existing architectural style while the addition is largely glass and slightly angled at its center where its façade extends to the street. Part of the east side of the existing building is windowless because the building was reduced in size when the Sixth Avenue subway was built in 1927.

The building, which has balconies, is close to the Holland Tunnel and SoHo.

It has no roof deck and no sidewalk landscaping.

Maserati of Manhattan is a commercial tenant on the ground floor.

Amenities

The building has an attended lobby with a 24-hour concierge and an automated parking system for 47 cars in which residents can retrieve their cars from computer terminals in the garage or their own loft.

The fourth floor has a rooftop swimming pool and a gym.

Apartments

Apartments have Mafi Austrian wide plank oak flooring and washers and dryers.

Kitchens have Valcucine Vitrium glass cabinetry and Miele, Sub Zero and Bosch appliances.

Master bathrooms have Calacutta gold marble floors.

Apartment 3C is a two-bedroom unit that has a 25-foot-long gallery that leads to a 21-foot-long living/dining room with an open kitchen with an island.

Apartment  3F is a two-bedroom unit with a 26-foot-long entry gallery that opens onto a 8-foot-long home office and a 31-foot-long living/dining room with an open kitchen.

Apartment 5E is a four-bedroom unit that has an 11-foot-long entry foyer that leads to a 22-foot-long living/dining room with an 18-foot-long open kitchen with an island and both areas face a five-sided, 197-square-foot balcony.

Apartment 8B is a three-bedroom unit with a 9-foot-long entry foyer that opens onto a 35-foot-long living/dining room with a 12-foot-long open kitchen with an island and both face a diamond-shaped, 235-square-foot balcony.

Apartment 9C is a two-bedroom unit with a 35-foot-long entry gallery that leads past a 13-foot-long open kitchen to a 16-foot-long, corner dining room that adjoins a 19-foot-long, corner living room.

History

The project was approved in 2005 by the City Council.

One resident, Michael Hirtenstein, bought five apartments to combine them.

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One United Nations Park
Between East 39th Street & East 40th Street
Murray Hill
One United Nations Park is an unprecedented interplay of privacy and light—a balance that reflects the architecture’s bold exterior and luminous interiors.
Learn More
One United Nations Park - Exterior View - Building One United Nations Park - Exterior/Interior View - Terrace and Living Room One United Nations Park - Interior View - Colorful Living Room One United Nations Park - Interior View - Bedroom One United Nations Park - Interior View - Children's Play Room