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Pile-driving starts at 70 Little West Street

November 10, 2006

Pile-driving has begun for a 33-story residential condominium building at 70 Little West Street, the last residential site in Battery Park City.

The building will have 251 condominiums and occupy the block bounded by Battery Place, Little West Street, Second Place and Third Place.

The building, which will overlook the Museum of Jewish Heritage, will be distinguished by a curved facade and 40,000 square feet in the 500,000-square foot project will be occupied by the Battery Park City Parks Conservancy.

The Albanese Organization and the Starwood Capital Group Global at the developers.

Completion is anticipated in 2008.

The Albanese Organization, which is based in Garden City, Long Island, will open a sales office in late spring for this building, its third residential project at Hugh L. Carey Battery Park City. SCLE and Pelli Clarke Pelli are the architectural firms for the project. Pelli Clarke Pelli also designed the developer's two other projects at Battery Park city, the 27-story Solaire at 20 River Terrace and the 24-story Verdesian at 211 North End Avenue.

Like the Verdesian and the Solaire, the new building will be "green," that is, constructed to minimize energy costs.

The Albanese Organization's other major projects in Manhattan include 100 United Nations Plaza.

Financing for the project includes a $244 million construction loan provided by Helaba of Frankfurt, Germany.

Stedila Design Inc. is the interior design firm for the project and apartments will have low volatile organic compound paint, reclaimed wood flooring, organic black stone countertops, recycled carpeting, recycling flooring in bathoods, wall coverings in hallways from wood and honeysuckle vines and kitchen and bathroom cabinetry will be bamboo.

The building's hallways will have fluorescent lighting that dims when not occupied. The building will have a fitness center, pool, lounge, dining area, playroom and garage. The building will harvest rainwater and store recycled water to irrigate the rooftop garden.


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