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1150 Park Avenue: Review and Ratings

between East 91st Street & East 92nd Street View Full Building Profile

Carter Horsley
Review of 1150 Park Avenue by Carter Horsley

This 89-unit co-operative apartment building at 1150 Park Avenue on the southwest corner at 92nd Street was erected by Marcus Brown & Sons in 1940, two years after the very handsome, neo-Georgian, red-brick design of the Brick Presbyterian Church, designed by York & Sawyer, was completed.

The church’s modernity was seized upon by architect George F. Pelham Jr., who not only designed this building but also 1130 Park Avenue one block south and his red-brick designs nicely complement the church with considerable contextual grace.

This 19-story building was built the same year that Pelham also completed 785 Park Avenue.

Bottom Line

A handsome, 1940, red-brick building with many corner bay windows just to the north of the lovely, red-brick Brick Presbyterian Church in the heart of Carnegie Hill.

Description

The building has a canopied, one-step-up entrance and its address is on the building’s façade above the Art Deco-style entryway.

This building has a one-story limestone base but is indented above the second story to provide more corner windows.

The building has no sidewalk landscaping and no garage, although it does have discrete air-conditioners.

Amenities

The building has a doorman, a resident superintendent, a gym, a laundry room and a bicycle room.

Apartments

Penthouse D is a one-bedroom unit with a 19-foot-long entrance gallery that leads to a 19-foot-long living room with a fireplace with a 12-foot-long dinging alcove next to a 19-foot-long kitchen that opens onto a 24-foot-long south terrace.  The dining room opens onto a very long west terrace that wraps around to the long north terrace that is entered from the master bedroom that has a corner bay window.

Apartment 17F is a two-bedroom unit that has a small entry foyer that opens onto a 14-foot-wide gallery that leads to a 23-foot-long living room with a corner bay window and a 17-foot-wide corner terrace that also abuts the master bedroom with a corner bay window.  A 12-foot-wide dining room with a corner window is off the living room and leads to a 10-foot-long pantry and a 13-foot-long kitchen.

Apartment 10C is a two-bedroom unit that has a 20-foot-long entrance gallery that leads to a 28-foot-long living/dining room with a fireplace and a corner bay window and opens onto a south terrace and a west terrace and is next to an 18-foot-long kitchen.  The master bedroom also has its own south terrace.

Apartment 3A is a two-bedroom unit with a small entry foyer that leads to a 13-foot-wide gallery that opens onto a 24-foot-living room with a fireplace and a 10-foot-long dining room with a corner bay window next to a 13-foot-long kitchen.  The master bedroom has a corner bay window.

Apartment 3F is a two-bedroom unit with a small entry foyer that leads to a 14-foot-wide gallery that leads to a 24-foot-long living room with a fireplace that opens onto a 13-foot-long dining room with a corner bay window next to a large kitchen.  The master bedroom also has a corner bay window.

 

History

According to a February 25, 1940 article in The New York Times, “the site has an interesting historical background" and “was known as Observatory Place.” Mrs. Adrian Iselin, who donated the land beneath the Brick Presbyterian Church, “had a sign placed on the property calling attention to this fact.”  Mrs. Iselin’s mother was for many years, according to a November 26, 1897 article in The New York Times, “with Mrs. Astor and Mrs. August Belmont, one of the three acknowledged feminine leaders of New York society…She was a tall and handsome woman, exceedingly dignified in manner, and was in appearance and bearing a typical grande dame.”

Location

The site is at the crest of Carnegie Hill and the neighborhood is highly desirable for families because of its churches and schools.

There are several attractive small restaurants nearby on Madison Avenue as well as an excellent hardware store.

The nearest Lexington Avenue subway station, however, is a few blocks away.

Rating

25
Out of 44

Architecture Rating: 25 / 44

+
28
Out of 36

Location Rating: 28 / 36

+
15
Out of 39

Features Rating: 15 / 39

+
9
=
77

CityRealty Rating Reference

 
Architecture
  • 30+ remarkable
  • 20-29 distinguished
  • 11-19 average
  • < 11 below average
 
Location
  • 27+ remarkable
  • 18-26 distinguished
  • 9-17 average
  • < 9 below average
 
Features
  • 22+ remarkable
  • 16-21 distinguished
  • 9-15 average
  • < 9 below average
  • #45 Rated co-op - Carnegie Hill
 
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