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A blog from CityRealty (Links below will take you to the 6sqft site)

Sage House, 4 Lexington Avenue

Between East 21st Street & East 22nd Street

 

Comment About the Building

Pre-war Gramercy bldg. Bldg has 2 sections. Great location right next door to Gramercy Park Hotel 

More Comments About the Building

"Landmark (2000) Full service luxury cooperative. Built circa 1912-1913. Penthouse Addition 1922-1923. Annex built 1930-1931. Grosvenor Atterbury, Architect. Converted to cooperative in 1987. 165 units. Currently 98% sold. 24 hour doorman, concierge, common laundry room, storage lockers. Flexible sublet policy on annual basis subject to board approval (renewable). Board is thorough but generally considered "easy". There is a considerable amount of paperwork involved in Purchase & Sublease Applications but over time the fees have just been increased. Prime Gramercy Park location situated near all major dining and transportation."
"Stunning, Ornate Pre-war Building just north of Gramercy Park"
"Sage House was built in 1913 as the home of the Russell Sage Foundation, the philanthropic organization named in honor of the railroad tycoon, politician, and Wall Street financier. The Foundation's purpose was the study of social issues and improved living conditions in the United States. Prominent architect Grosvenor Atterbury designed the building in the style of a Florentine Renaissance palace incorporating vaulted ceilings and a red sandstone facade with carved decorative shields. The two top floors were devoted to the Foundation's social work library, one of the finest libraries of its type. The Archdiocese of New York purchased the building in 1949 to house the offices of Catholic Charities. In 1975, the building was converted to residential use."
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One United Nations Park
Between East 39th Street & East 40th Street
Murray Hill
One United Nations Park is an unprecedented interplay of privacy and light—a balance that reflects the architecture’s bold exterior and luminous interiors.
Learn More
One United Nations Park - Exterior View - Building One United Nations Park - Exterior/Interior View - Terrace and Living Room One United Nations Park - Interior - Corner View - Living Room One United Nations Park - Interior - Living Room - View of ESB One United Nations Park - Interior View - Colorful Living Room