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A blog from CityRealty (Links below will take you to the 6sqft site)

Features

Rendering of 355 Eighth Avenue via MAG Partners Rendering of 355 Eighth Avenue via MAG Partners
The construction industry took a significant hit during the coronavirus pandemic, and numbers recently emerged to back that up: According to a report by New York State Comptroller Thomas D. Napoli, New York lost a total of 44,400 construction jobs due to the coronavirus pandemic, the industry’s worst decline in over 25 years. This is especially jarring because the city saw a 43.5 percent rise in construction jobs between 2011 and 2019. But in 2020, construction jobs in New York City alone declined by 14.4 percent.

"The COVID-19 pandemic created uncertainty across all sectors of the economy, and it was no different for the construction industry" - Gary LaBarbera, President, Building and Construction Trades Council of Greater New York

Certain projects were deemed essential at the height of the pandemic, and New York’s construction sector was able to start up again last June. However, construction jobs are still lagging behind the rebound other industries have experienced. Nevertheless, construction spending showed an 8.5 percent decline compared to 2019; this comes after eight consecutive years of growth, and spending is likely to stay flat for the next two years.
It remains to be seen how this is to be remedied. Comptroller DiNapoli, the Building Trades and Construction Council of Greater New York, and the New York Building Congress have all cited the proposed American Jobs Plan as a path forward for both the industry’s recovery and local infrastructure. Additionally, an editorial in Crain’s New York Business called out wealthy neighborhoods (Soho, Noho, and the Upper East Side) for their resistance to development that would create jobs as well as more housing units. As we wait to see how this will pan out, see a selection of new renderings of projects in the works all over New York City.

230-Classon-Avenue-01 Rendering of 230 Classon Avenue via Quinlan Development Group
In a statement, Quinlan Development Group partner Tyler Wilkins said, “Despite the challenges of last year, our belief in Brooklyn and the rest of New York City remains strong.” To that end, the developer has broken ground on 230 Classon Avenue, a new mixed-income rental on a parcel owned by St. Mary’s Church. Upon completion, which is estimated for 2023, the 17-story building will contain 138 one- to two-bedroom residences, 30 percent of which will be designated affordable.

The design by DXA Studio will focus on highly efficient layouts, and select units will have private outdoor space (either balconies or yards). Residential amenities will include a dog run, fitness center, study lounge/business center, storage, bike room, and lounge with pool table, television, and entertainment kitchen. Outdoor amenities will include a private street-level park, a landscaped terrace on the third floor, and a furnished roof deck with 360-degree views. The project will also offer 98 on-site parking spaces and easy access to the Classon Avenue G train.

69-65-Yellowstone-Boulevard-01 Rendering via Aufgang Architects
In the Forest Hills section of Queens, the groundbreaking has taken place for 69-65 Yellowstone Boulevard, a new development by Slate Property Group in partnership with Grobman-Gross Properties. Aufgang Architects is the designer of record for the building, which rises on the former site of a Key Foods supermarket owned by the Grobman and Gross families.

Completion is estimated for 2023, at which time the building will feature 50,000 square feet of retail space across the ground floor and lower levels and 166 apartments, 50 of which will be affordable. According to permits, amenities will include a package room/mail room, lounge, fitness center, third-floor terrace, and outdoor roof deck. The building will also offer a bike room and 186 parking spaces, and is located three blocks from the Forest Hills - 71st Avenue subway stop.

 
 
 
 
755-White-Plains-Road
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755-White-Plains-Road
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755-White-Plains-Road
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Stevenson Commons is a 948-unit housing complex in the Soundview section of the Bronx, and developer Camber Property hopes to nearly double that: A plan calls for adding six new buildings with 735 affordable housing units to the property.

The proposal calls for 563 affordable rental units for low- and moderate-income households, defined as 30 to 100 percent Area Median Income (AMI). One building will be devoted to 114 units of senior housing for low-income seniors (below 50 percent of the AMI) in partnership with Regional Aid for Interim Needs (R.A.I.N.) for on-site social and health services. Additionally, 58 affordable one- to three-bedroom co-ops as well as a partnership with Habitat for Humanity for homeownership education and preparation.

Along with the new housing, the expansion will also create 420 parking spaces, a 24-hour childcare facility and universal pre-K, after-school programming, a summer tennis program, playgrounds, and a community garden program. The proposal was unveiled in September 2020, and the developer has just filed for an environmental review.

39-40-30th-Street-01 Rendering of Thirtieth via Winick
In December 2019, the Department of Buildings signed off on demolition permits for a two-story building at 39-40 30th Street in Long Island City. Permits have not yet been filed for a replacement, but developer SBD 1 Oak has revealed its plan for the site: an 11-story mixed-use project with 10,000 square feet of retail space on the ground floor (for which Winick is handling the leasing) and 103 rental apartments, 30 percent of which will be designated affordable. Amenities are to include 49 parking spaces. The property has been through the New York State Brownfields program for environmental remediation, and the project received entitlements to proceed from all required agencies.

118-Hope-Street-01 Zoning diagram via NYC Department of Buildings
118-Hope-Street-02 Rendering via Clipper Equity
118-Hope-Street-03 Previous rendering via Hill West
Days before New York went on lockdown in March 2020, the de Blasio administration approved Clipper Equities’ plans for a seven-story rental building in the heart of Williamsburg at 118 Hope Street. More recently, The Real Deal reported that the developer landed a $79 million construction loan, and work is underway.

According to permits, J. Frankl is the architect of record. The new building will have 740 square feet of retail space and a total of 143 apartments. Amenities will include a courtyard, gym, co-working space, mail/package room, roof deck, bike room, 72 parking spaces, and laundry rooms on every floor. Construction is expected to take 24 months.

27-19-Thomson-Avenue-01 Rendering via ZD Jasper Realty
Permits for a new boutique building at 27-19 Thomson Avenue were filed in September 2018, and recent renderings depict a nine-story, 30-unit mixed-use building with two floors of retail space. The residential space on top boasts oversized windows and apartments with floor-to-ceiling windows and private terraces on the end. It will be topped with a private roof terrace.

Flushing-based architect My Architect PC is listed as the designer of record, and the project is being helmed by ZD Jasper Realty, which counts 5 Court Square and The Prime among its portfolio. An estimated completion date has not yet been provided.

45-30-Pearson-Street-01 Rendering via Marvel Architects
Shortly before New York went on lockdown in response to the coronavirus pandemic last year, permits were approved for a through-block building at 45-30 Pearson Street, an assemblage of eight tax lots located a stone’s throw from the Court Square subway station. The 25-story, 130-unit project is being developed in a joint venture between ZD Jasper Realty and Ascent Development, and Marvel Architects is the designer of record.

Renderings depict a stone tower with oversized windows where select units will have private terraces, and all residents will enjoy excellent natural light and interiors by Andres Escobar. Amenities are expected to include a 10,000-square-foot private park, a bike room, on-site parking, a fitness center, a children’s playroom, and a lounge. Excavation work is underway, and completion is estimated for February 2023.

144-Barrow-Street-01 144 Barrow Street via CityRealty
In the West Village, local developer William Gottlieb Real Estate demolished a garage at 144 Barrow Street and planned to replace it with a condo-hotel project. Morris Adjmi Architects is the designer of record, and renderings by the context-sensitive designer depict a seven-story building in line with its neighbors. Features include a stone facade, a tasteful penthouse addition, and oversized windows.

The site is across the street from the Keller Hotel, a New York City Landmark dating back to 1898 and featuring a rich history as a maritime hotel, a SRO, and home of the Keller Bar (the city’s oldest gay “leather” bar). The developer originally planned to convert it to a high-end hotel, but permits for a 10-unit boutique condominium were filed in spring 2020.

335-Eighth-Avenue-01 Rendering of 335 Eighth Avenue via MAG Partners
At the beginning of June 2021, affordable housing cooperative Penn South signed with MAG Partners to redevelop the aging 335 Eighth Avenue into a new 200-unit building with commercial space, including a grocery store. The project will be developed under the Affordable NY Program with 30 percent of its units will be reserved for low and middle-income New Yorkers; moreover, MAG Partners’ plan to develop and operate the building under a long-term ground lease will support Penn South’s objective to maintain long-term affordability.

The new building is expected to commence construction in 2022. In the meantime, a rendering of a design by COOKFOX Architects shows a contemporary take on the historic character of Chelsea. Founder Rick Cook describes the project as an opportunity to bring “wellness focused, nature connected residences for a diverse new community.”

415 Madison Avenue, Midtown East
415-Madison-Avenue-01 All images of 415 Madison Avenue via Rudin Management Co.
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In the wake of Midtown East’s 2017 rezoning, the neighborhood has seen proposals to tear down existing office towers and build soaring, state-of-the-art commercial buildings in their place. Among them is 415 Madison Avenue: In November 2019, Rudin Management Co. approached City Hall with a proposal to tear down the 24-story post war office building and erect a new tower with pedestrian access to the planned Long Island Rail Road concourse under Grand Central Terminal. The plan was inspired by the nearby JPMorgan Chase headquarters (the world’s largest building to be intentionally demolished), and would in fact use development rights from JPMorgan Chase to erect a new building.

Demolition permits were filed in March 2020, just before New York City shut down, and new renderings for a 605-foot-high tower were recently revealed. Some have questioned whether there is a place for new office skyscrapers in the post-pandemic world, but the rendering depicts floor-to-ceiling windows and outdoor terraces that might entice some into this office.

101 Franklin Street, Tribeca
 
 
 
 
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Tribeca has seen its industrial buildings transformed into highly coveted residences, but new commercial space has been somewhat sparser in the area. Columbia Property Trust announced plans to change that with the redevelopment of 101 Franklin Street (formerly known as 250 Church Street), which dates back to 1948, into a sleek new office building. The developer promises expansive floor plates ranging from 8,300 to 16,500 square feet, and renderings by acclaimed architect Rafael Vinoly depict a contemporary facade, floor-to-ceiling windows, pocket parks, and a large roof terrace. While well-heeled residents would be able to walk to work, the building’s address near the Franklin Street 1 and the World Trade Center transportation hub would benefit workers from all over New York. The developer acquired the property in 2019; an early 2022 delivery date is estimated on the developer's website, but it is unclear how the pandemic has affected their plans.

 
 
 
 
385-Broadway
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385-Broadway
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385-Broadway
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385-Broadway
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385-Broadway
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According to Real Estate Weekly, 385 Broadway was managed by two sisters, Matilda and Charlotte Grosvenor, when it was built in 1875. Nearly 150 years later, two sisters are again at the helm - Colleen and Hailey Brooks signed a 20-year lease for the whole building as the flagship for their leisure club, Highcourt.

Highcourt benefits from a prime location at the intersection of Soho, Tribeca, and Chinatown, and all five floors will be dedicated to what the founders describe as Intelligent Leisure. Offerings will include a double-height welcome gallery; “hothouse” with hammam, sauna, and steam rooms; training studios for personal fitness sessions and group classes; a large open co-working space with cafe and private meeting area; a restaurant and lounge spearheaded by the team behind The Fat Radish and The Orchard Townhouse; and a private rooftop garden deck.

Highcourt had originally planned to welcome founding members in March 2020 and open in July 2020, but the coronavirus pandemic affected that timeline and opening is now planned for 2021. Some wonder if there is a market for leisure clubs in the wake of the pandemic, but the founders see them as more necessary than ever - Hailey Brooks told Forbes, “As we continue to work, live, and work out at home, our daily balance will be challenged and a separate space dedicated to leisure becomes even more crucial for achieving proper quality of life.

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