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There are 5 apartments for sale at 185 West End Avenue (last updated on Sep 23, 2022)

Lincoln Towers, 185 West End Avenue

Co-op located in Upper West Side, between West 66th Street & West 70th Street

Description of Lincoln Towers at 185 West End Avenue

185 West End Avenue was built in 1962 and has a total of 432 apartments. Located in the Upper West Side, Lincoln Towers is a short walk to the 1, 2 and 3 subway lines.

There are currently 5 apartments for sale at 185 West End Avenue, ranging in price from $425,000 to $2,849,999. The most recent closing in the building was in August 2022 - a six plus bedroom that closed for $500,000.

During the past two years, 34 apartments have sold: the most expensive was a two bedroom that sold for $1,550,000, and the least expensive was a six plus bedroom that sold for $440,000.

Amenities at this pet friendly post war building include doorman, full service garage, resident storage and washer/dryer in building.

Similar nearby buildings include 165 West End Avenue, 180 West End Avenue and 150 West End Avenue.

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Building Facts

  • Year Built: 1962
    Building Type: Co-op
    Neighborhood: Lincoln Center (Manhattan)
    Minimum Down Payment: 25%
  • Total Apartments: 432 432
    Total Floors: 29
    Doorman: FT Doorman
    Pets: Allowed

Apartment Pricing Stats

Avg. Price / ft2
Avg. Price / ft2

Building Amenities

  • FT Doorman
  • Post War
  • Resident Storage
  • Full Service Garage
  • Garden
  • Washer/Dryer in building
  • Elevator

Apartments for Sale at 185 West End Avenue (5) View history of all units

5
Available Apts
$425K - $2.85M
Price Range
$1,277
Avg. Price / ft2
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Lincoln Towers: Rating

24
Out of 44

Architecture Rating: 24 / 44

+
23
Out of 36

Location Rating: 23 / 36

+
12
Out of 39

Features Rating: 12 / 39

=
59

CityRealty Rating Reference

 
Architecture
  • 30+ remarkable
  • 20-29 distinguished
  • 11-19 average
  • < 11 below average
 
Location
  • 27+ remarkable
  • 18-26 distinguished
  • 9-17 average
  • < 9 below average
 
Features
  • 22+ remarkable
  • 16-21 distinguished
  • 9-15 average
  • < 9 below average
  • #10 Rated co-op - Lincoln Center
 

Carter Horsley's Review of Lincoln Towers

Carter Horsley's Building Review
"This is one of the eight 28-story apartment buildings that were built as part of the Lincoln Towers residential component of the vast Lincoln Square Urban Renewal Project that also created the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts and a Manhattan campus for Fordham University.More than 7,000 low-income families and about 800 businesses were displaced on the vast redevelopment site, once known as San Juan Hill, and before their demolition the tenement buildings were vacated and provided many of the sets for the movie version of the plan "West Side Story."The Lincoln Towers enclave contains a total of 3,897 apartments of which 430 are in this building that was completed in 1962 and converted to a cooperative in 1987.The residential towers, all designed by S. J. Kessler & Sons, are located on 19 percent of a 36-acre site that is divided by West End Avenue and runs from 66th to 70th Streets and from Amsterdam Avenue to Freedom Place that was named to honor Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Cheney who were civil rights workers killed near Meriden, Mississippi in 1964. The west side of Freedom Place is the eastern boundary of the former New York Central rail yards along the Hudson River that developer Donald Trump is developing as Riverside South, a huge, high-rise apartment enclave.Much of the opposition to Trump's mammoth project, which finally went into construction in 1997, came from residents of Lincoln Towers, many of whose views of the Hudson River were threatened by the proposed new towers. On the other hand, Trump's project is replacing long abandoned and derelict rail yards with a coordinated architectural ensemble modeled in part after the great towers of Central Park West and which are likely to result in further gentrification of the area.Writing about Lincoln Towers in their book, "New York 1960, Architecture and Urbanism Between The Second World War And The Bicentennial," (The Monacelli Press, 1995), authors Robert A. M. Stern, Thomas Mellins and David Fishman wrote that:The towers, indeed, are very long slabs: in his book, "Upper West Story, A History And Guide," (Abbeville Press, 1989), Peter Salwen describes "the great gray mass of Lincoln Towers, apartment mega-blocks on a scale immense enough to satisfy a Mussolini." The Mussolini here, of course, was none other than the legendary Robert Moses, a visionary planner who attained incredible political power and was the most prodigious builder in the city's history albeit not the most aesthetically inspired. In his unauthorized biography of Robert Moses, "The Power Broker, Robert Moses and the Fall of New York," (Alfred A. Knopf, 1974), Robert A. Caro maintained that "Moses was not making even a pretense of creating new homes for the families displaced." The largest slum clearance project of its kind in the nation when it was built, Lincoln Square (including the performing arts center) has radically transformed the Upper West Side, but that transformation has taken a long time. It must be ruled a success economically even if, aesthetically, it is a tremendous disappointment. Only in the 1990's, however, has the Lincoln Center district really come into its own as a very desirable "luxury" location and the more recent projects have begun to dwarf, at least vertically, this otherwise monumentally large complex whose open spaces will undoubtedly become more and more appreciated." Read Carter's Full Review
Pros
  • Doorman
  • Close to Riverside Park
  • Landscaped parks
  • Garage
  • Many good views
  • Centrally air-conditioned
  • Many balconies
  • Close to Lincoln Center
  • Close to Subway
Cons
  • Very large complex and buildings
  • No health club
  • No sundeck
  • Many views will be impaired by new high-rise construction to the west
  • Banal architecture
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Subways

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
at Broadway 0.26 miles
 

Sales Summary - Past 12 Months

View By Apartment Sizes
Past 12 Months
$739,452
Avg. Price
Based on 21 Sales
 

Closing History - Last 10 sales

10
Units Sold
$450K - $1.6M
Price Range
$1,085
Avg. Price / ft2

Pricing Comparison of Similar Buildings

View Detailed Comparison

Alternate Addresses

  • 185 West End Avenue
  • 187 West End Avenue

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