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Mapping All of NYC's Passive House Projects Mapping All of NYC's Passive House Projects
Updated 4/22/2021 with new projects and details about the new building grades.

In response to then-President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris Climate Agreement (it has since returned), Mayor de Blasio announced an initiative aiming for an 80% reduction in New York City’s carbon emissions by 2050. As New York’s buildings are responsible for nearly 70 percent of the city’s carbon emissions, a key component of the plan is a new letter grading system instituted in fall 2020: New York City buildings 25,000 square feet and larger are required to post a letter grade, much like the ones seen in restaurants but based on the Environmental Protection Agency’s Energy Star score of 1 to 100, as determined by energy consumption. Building owners have been required to provide this information for years, but it was previously hidden away in a database; this puts it literally at the forefront. In December 2020, Gothamist reported that roughly half of the buildings that posted grades received Ds or lower.

Some real estate professionals have objected to the initiative, arguing that it doesn’t take into account the number of people living or working in a building, while others see it as a call to action to get their grade up by any number of steps, which could range from switching out incandescent lighting for LED or installing better insulated windows. There is a deadline for this: When local law 97 goes into effect in 2024, buildings will be required to meet emission limits or face steep fines.

About Passive House

A certain class of buildings is likely to receive As: Over the last decade, an elite group of developers, builders, and owners in the city have taken it upon themselves to dramatically improve the energy efficiency of their structures. Stirred by the incredible energy savings and environmental benefits possible, several dozen projects have enlisted in the German-born Passive House certification process. The rigorous standard, which includes airtightness and solar shading, results in quiet interiors, ultra-efficient heating and cooling systems, and highly-insulated building envelopes with the ultimate prospect of requiring little energy for space heating or cooling - meaning more money saved on your energy bills, which many would welcome in these troubled economic times. And if you want to talk numbers, according to the official website of New York Passive House Inc., this type of construction "delivers up to approximately a 90% reduction in heating and cooling demand and up to a 75% reduction in overall primary energy demand" compared to most existing buildings.

Marianne Hyde, a partner at leading Passive House firm, Zakrzewski + Hyde Architects tells us going for Passive House certification can result in very little additional cost to major renovations or new construction endeavors— especially as more contractors become familiar with the standard and compliant products become more widely available.
So far, we’ve identified 65* Passive House projects in the city. Some have adopted Passive House features, others are fully certified, and it is more than likely that the number of projects adopting such energy-efficient components and construction will continue to rise in coming years.

*This is an ongoing list and will continually be updated as more Passive House projects emerge.

MANHATTAN:

466 Columbus Avenue Rendering BKSK Architects

Charlotte of the Upper West Side, 470 Columbus Avenue


Neighborhood: Broadway Corridor

Building Type: Condominium


This Upper West Side-Central Park West Historic District development was approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) the second time around, when the design was revisited by BKSK Architects. The context-sensitive red brick facade and terra cotta fins are underpinned by robust insulation and airtight seals to minimize air leaks and drafts. A terra cotta louver system keeps the units bright, and is designed to deflect heat in summer and bring in sunlight in winter. The full-floor, four-bedroom apartments feature triple-layer windows, quadruple layers of high-performance acoustically insulated QuietRock drywall, non-toxic materials and finishes, energy-efficient appliances, wood flooring and doors certified by the Forest Stewardship Council, locally sourced marble in the kitchens and baths, and their own state-of-the-art energy recovery ventilation system (ERV) to deliver fresh, filtered outdoor air into each home. Listings are expected to go live later this spring.
25-West-88th-Street-01 25 West 88th Street via Leslie J. Garfield

25 West 88th Street


Neighborhood: Central Park West

Building Type: Townhouse


This Upper West Side townhouse dates back to 1889, but its infrastructure is up to the standards imposed by today’s Passive House certification process. Following an extensive gut renovation, features include hospital-grade air filters and plasma ionizers, triple filtration of the water supply, triple-pane glass windows, solar panels, superior insulation, LED lighting, and rear yard fencing and benches made from recycled Coney Island boardwalk. None of this, though, came at the expense of the historic brownstone exterior. It is listed for $17.5 million.
806-Ninth-Avenue-01 Rendering of The Lirio via CetraRuddy

The Lirio, 806 Ninth Avenue


Neighborhood: Midtown West

Building Type: Rental


Developer Hudson Companies and non-profit Housing Works have partnered up for The Lirio, a new affordable housing building planned for Hell's Kitchen and designed to meet rigorous Passive House standards with such features as a high-performance building envelope, VRF HVAC, solar power, and green roofs. The 112 units will comprise 89 apartments for individuals living with HIV, 44 units for low-income families, and nine units for the formerly homeless. The development will also feature an office for the MTA, a Housing Works flagship store, and neighborhood retail. Completion is estimated for 2023.
60-White-Street-01 60 White Street via Sorgente Group of America

60 White Street


Neighborhood: Tribeca

Building Type: Condo


60 White Street is a cast iron building dating back to 1869, and a recent conversion to condos has taken it well into the 21st century: Eighty percent of materials salvaged from the original structure were reused in the conversion, and the building is up to Passive House standards with a new class of windows, radiant heat throughout the residences, a blue roof rainwater collection system, and an air-purifying green wall in the lobby. Current availabilities start at $6.5 million.
Houston House Rendering Houston House rendering via Lee Properties Group

Houston House, 298 East 2nd Street


Neighborhood: East Village

Building Type: Condominium


Brought forth by Lee Properties Group and Zakrzewski + Hyde Architects, this condo project will feature six full-floor units and a duplex townhouse with a projected sellout of $26.9 million. Although originally meant to be the first Passive House-rated CLT structure in the city, the 8-story Houston House will settle for Passive House Plus certification. Construction topped out in spring 2019, and current availabilities start at $2.5 million.
11 west 126th street Rendering The Bluestone Organization

11 West 126th Street


Neighborhood: Harlem

Building Type: Condominium


11 West 126th Street recently topped out and revealed its facade. The windows have been installed, but a Harlem Bespoke post notes that construction stalled earlier this summer. When complete, it will hold six full-floor residences, a common roof terrace, a fitness center, a laundry room, and residential storage.
223-East-25th-Street-01 Engine 16 via Baxt Ingui Architects

Engine 16, 223 East 25th Street


Neighborhood: Gramercy Park

Building Type: Condominium


A short distance from Kip's Bay's "Hospital Alley," a firehouse originally built for Engine Company 16 in 1879 is being converted to a four-unit condominium and gut renovated to Passive House standards, including a solar canopy on the roof. Fortunately for architecture enthusiasts, this will not come at the expense of the building’s Classically-informed facade.
544 East 13th Street Reno Google Street View Image (Sep 2017)

544 East 13th Street


Neighborhood: East Village

Building Type: Cooperative


Paul A. Castrucci Architect is designing this East Village affordable housing project, which has served as a home for city squatters and most notably, the on and off residence for the family of Rosario Dawson. The process, through which the firm engaged with the existing tenants, included a gut renovation to prepare the building's air-tight construction with improved insulation and windows.
Perch Harlem Rendering Synapse Development Group

Perch Harlem, 542 West 153rd Street


Neighborhood: Hamilton Heights

Building Type: Rental


Perch Harlem offers 34 compartmentalized apartments, meaning residents can enjoy central heating and cooling, fresh air, lower energy bills, and proper insulation that protects their ears from the noisy city streets. It is notably the first operational Passive House rental in Manhattan, and passed the blower door test for certification.
312 Canal Street Rendering Paul A. Castrucci Architect

312-322 Canal Street


Neighborhood: Tribeca

Building Type: Rental


Landmarks Preservation Commission approved a new design by Paul A. Castrucci Architect in January 2018, stating that the overhauled design fits better with the district in terms of rhythm and height. What has not changed, though, are plans for a continuously insulated Passive House certified project with optimized energy consumption; complete with high-efficiency heat pumps to condition interior units on an individual basis while energy recovery ventilators continuously supply the residences with filtered and conditioned fresh and healthy air.
511 East 86th Street Rendering Arquitectonica

Convivium, 515 East 86th Street


Neighborhood: Yorkville

Building Type: Rental


If all the rigorous Passive House certification standards are met, this new mixed-use Yorkville building will use approximately 80% less energy than similar buildings in the area. It will also provide consistently comfortable temperatures and better air quality. An affordable lottery took place last spring, and market-rate availabilities start at $2,385/month (net effective to reflect three months free rent).
Sendero Verde Rendering Handel Architects

Sendero Verde, 1691 Madison Avenue


Neighborhood: East Harlem

Building Type: Rental


In summer 2019, a deal was reached for the first phase of this 100 percent affordable, 750,000-square-foot mixed-use development, which will comprise 655 affordable units, a community facility, school, commercial space, and large public courtyard. The first phase topped out in November 2020, and completion is estimated for 2022.
265 West 126th Street Rendering NYC Housing Preservation & Development

Balton Commons, 265 West 126th Street


Neighborhood: Harlem

Building Type: Rental


Work is underway on Balton Commons, a new development on the former site of the Mandela community garden in Harlem. The building is being designed to Passive House standards and will feature tech incubator space managed by Silicon Harlem, community facility space, ground-floor commercial space, and 37 affordable apartments for residents earning between 30 and 90 percent of the area median income. Completion is estimated for 2022.
211 West 29th Street Rendering Flow Chelsea via CityRealty

Flow Chelsea, 211 West 29th Street


Neighborhood: Chelsea

Building Type: Rental


Living in Manhattan is expensive, but residents of Passive Houses can expect to save on energy costs. A 24-story, 55-unit rental nearing completion in Chelsea will utilize methods that will reduce heat gain and energy loss. This marks another in-progress project by Zakrzewski + Hyde Architects. An affordable lottery for 15 units took place last summer, and leasing launched on market-rate units in December 2019.
14-White-Street-1 14 White Street rendering via DXA Studio

14 White Street


Neighborhood: Tribeca

Building Type: Condo


This new building is in the Tribeca East Historic District, and its 85-foot height and contemporary metal envelope were designed by DXA Studio and NAVA to create a dialogue with its historic cast iron neighbors. However, the new building is not all style and no substance: It was built to Passive House standards with high-performance windows and a continuously insulated rain screen envelope beneath the metal-clad exterior. Construction topped out in spring 2018.
16 East 126th Street Photo by CityRealty

16 East 126th Street


Neighborhood: Harlem

Building Type: Townhouse


This Harlem brownstone retrofit is has been undergoing a renovation since 2016. The construction process involves a vertical partial floor expansion and converting its 11 units into just two duplex apartments with a roof deck. Permits list Downtown Designworks Architecture as the architect of record.
130 West 95th Street Street Exterior Google Street View

130 West 95th Street


Neighborhood: Broadway Corridor

Building Type: Townhouse


Going down the Passive House road has not been easy for this gut rehab/addition project - as the townhouse owners, Abel B’Hahn and Lorna Davis, have extensively documented on their blog. The renovated home is "aiming to be not just the most environmentally sustainable townhouse in Manhattan, but a net zero energy home."
527 1/2 Manhattan Avenue Exterior Murphy Burnham & Buttrick Architects

Harlem Passive House, 527 1/2 Manhattan Avenue


Neighborhood: Harlem

Building Type: Townhouse


Construction is wrapping up on this beautiful brownstone located in Harlem. The five-story home was gut renovated to include a perimeter built-up wall of 7” cellulose inside a vapor barrier with an outer partition wall for running electrical conduit, aluminum-clad wood windows, a Mitsubishi mini-split heat pump, and a large skylight. Passive House features aside, interiors of the home are gorgeous, modern, and airy.
37-Hillside-Avenue-01 Rendering via Coconut Properties

37 Hillside Avenue


Neighborhood: Inwood

Building Type: Rental


37 Hillside Avenue, an amenity-rich new senior supportive housing project with a church at the base, will be constructed to meet Passive House standards. The building will be cooled and heated with a variable-refrigerant flow heat recovery system. Packaged rooftop energy recovery ventilator systems will supply filtered and fresh air directly into each apartment and exhaust from kitchens and bathrooms in a continuous ventilation cycle. Hot water will be generated by high-efficiency gas-fired water heaters.
206-East-20th-Street-01 206 East 20th Street via Bond New York

206 East 20th Street


Neighborhood: Gramercy

Building Type: Townhouse


206 East 20th Street was among the first townhouses in New York to embrace Passive House design. Features include meticulous exterior insulation, triple glazed windows, a high-performance air filtration system, energy-efficient lighting, organic paint, and low VOC eco-friendly materials. In a 2019 interview with Mansion Global, the owners said the insulation created “pin-drop silence” even with construction going on next door.
ABC No Rio Rendering Paul A. Castrucci Architect

ABC No Rio, 156 Rivington Street


Neighborhood: Lower East Side

Building Type: Commercial


Who says Passive House construction is just for residential developments? This forthcoming project is for the new and improved ABC No Rio, a community arts organization that's been around since the 1980's. The building, envisioned by Paul A. Castrucci Architect, is also expected to achieve LEED Silver status. ABC No Rio has been nearly eight years in the making and recently started taking donations to cover the higher-than-anticipated construction costs. The original building has been demolished, and the Department of Buildings has approved its environmentally friendly replacement.

BROOKLYN:

100-Flatbush-Avenue-01 100 Flatbush Avenue via Alloy Development

100 Flatbush Avenue


Neighborhood: Downtown Brooklyn

Building Type: Rental


Alloy Development has grand ambitions for "the most sustainable block in Brooklyn": The first of two towers planned for 100 Flatbush Avenue will be entirely electric, or fossil fuel independent, a first for New York City buildings. The school building, which will house the 350-seat Khalil Gibran International Academy and a public elementary school, is being designed to meet stringent Passive House international standards.
719-Sixth-Avenue-01 719 Sixth Avenue via CityRealty

719 Sixth Avenue


Neighborhood: South Slope-Greenwood Heights

Building Type: Condominium


A short distance from the lush greenery of Greenwood Cemetery, 719 Sixth Avenue brings Passive House construction to South Slope-Greenwood Heights. Its concrete form construction, triple-pane windows, and high-quality HRV air filtration units were instrumental in its designation, and provide extra benefits to residents in the form of improved air quality and lower energy bills. This is in addition to such official amenities as direct elevator access, smart intercom system, a common rear yard with turf lawn, and shared roof deck. A penthouse is currently on the market for $2.1 million.
669-St-Marks-Avenue-01 Rendering via BQE LLC

669 Saint Mark's Avenue


Neighborhood: Crown Heights

Building Type: Townhouse


At the beginning of 2019, demolition permits were filed for a Queen Anne/Romanesque Revival brownstone dating back to the end of the 19th century and located just outside the Crown Heights Historic District. As sad as it will be to lose an architectural treasure such as this, its replacement will benefit the neighborhood from an environmental standpoint: The five-story, nine-unit condominium planned for the site will be designed to Passive House standards with a high-efficiency building envelope, state-of-the-art air filtration, on-site storm water management, a 16 KW PV array, and green roofs. Renderings show nod to the townhouse in the form of an arch-topped bay.
288-Jackson-Street-01 Rendering of Cooper Park Commons via Architecture Outfit

Cooper Park Commons, 288 Jackson Street


Neighborhood: Williamsburg

Building Type: Rental


As part of the plan to convert the former Greenpoint Hospital to an affordable housing development, two Passive House buildings will be constructed; these will share green space with two converted buildings. Locals have responded enthusiastically to plans for the development, and the development team plans to kick off ULURP by June 21. If all goes according to plan, construction will start in spring 2022.
64-Degraw-Street-01 64 Degraw Street via Compass

64 Degraw Street


Neighborhood: Columbia Street Waterfront District

Building Type: Townhouse


In the Columbia Street Waterfront District, a townhouse has attracted attention for its cool minimalist aesthetic, luxurious interiors, and Passive House construction. Airtight insulation and European triple-pane windows were key factors in its designation, and additional features include a drive-in garage, 35’ backyard, smart thermostat, heated indoor pool, and roof deck.
271-Hicks-Street-01 271 Hicks Street via Douglas Elliman

271 Hicks Street


Neighborhood: Brooklyn Heights

Building Type: Townhouse


271 Hicks Street, a Greek Revival brownstone in the Brooklyn Heights Historic District, dates back to the 19th century, but has been impeccably renovated to modern standards. With new insulation, triple pane windows, five-zone central air, and continuous filtered fresh air, that includes Passive House standards.
Arras-01 Drawing of Arras via Handel Architects

Arras


Neighborhood: East New York

Building Type: Rental


Handel Architects has unveiled a concept design for Arras, a mixed-use residential project in East New York “designed to serve as a model of a socially transformative and environmentally conscious design.” The project is designed to Passive House standards and includes 326 affordable units, 13,100 square feet of retail space occupied by locally-based tenants, and approximately 20,500 square feet of community space.
Bethany-Terraces-01 Rendering of Bethany Terraces via Paul A. Castrucci Architects

Bethany Terraces


Neighborhood: East Flatbush

Building Type: Rental


At the beginning of the year, Paul A. Castrucci Architects received Department of Buildings approval for Bethany Terraces, an affordable senior housing complex planned for a sunny street in Brooklyn. The project intends to use modular construction, and is being designed to Passive House standards with a robust thermal envelope, heat recovery ventilators, air sealing, centralized gas domestic hot water heaters, and a rooftop solar array capable of bringing the building to Net Zero or Near Net Zero production.
138-Sackett-Street-01 Columbia Waterfront Condominiums via CityRealty

Columbia Waterfront Condominiums, 138 Sackett Street


Neighborhood: Carroll Gardens

Building Type: Condominium


Columbia Waterfront Condominiums was one of the first multi-family buildings in Brooklyn to integrate Passive House principles. Its attributes include triple-glazed doors and windows, a state-of-the-art air filtration system, and energy-efficient appliances. The environmentally friendly features and high-end interiors proved highly attractive to buyers - the building is sold out.
283-Greene-Avenue-1 Rendering of Frame via Guiding Architects

Frame 283, 283 Greene Avenue


Neighborhood: Clinton Hill

Building Type: Rental


283 Greene Avenue is a residential conversion of a two-story manufacturing building in Clinton Hill. The cross-laminated timber (CLT) in the construction comes from sustainably managed forests, and its weather-tight panels will go hand in hand with Passive House standards. CLT construction can help with climate change by improving the building's carbon storage by almost 68 percent, and a roof of solar panels will generate the majority of the building's energy needs. Construction topped out earlier in summer 2019, and rents are expected to range from $3,000 to over $6,000 per month.
107-Union-Street-01 107 Union Street via CityRealty

107 Union Street


Neighborhood: Carroll Gardens

Building Type: Rental


107 Union Street is a modern rental constructed to Passive House standards and featuring high-efficiency air exchanging and heating/cooling systems. However, this does not come at the expense of luxurious perks and amenities like soaring windows, backyard, roof deck, and garage with electric car charging station.
Hello Townhouses Rendering Zambrano Architects

The Wunderhill Townhouses, 22-36 Underhill Avenue


Neighborhood: Prospect Heights

Building Type: Condominium


As stylish and modern as the Wunderhill Townhouses are, the aesthetics do not come at the expense of the environment. The development is no longer aiming for Passive House certification but will employ green roofs and triple-paned windows and doors. These three-story, single-family houses will also have four inches of insulation on the outside and spray insulation on the inside. The combination of style and sustainability has proven irresistible -- the development is sold out.
210-Pacific-Street-1 210 Pacific Street via Halstead

210 Pacific Street


Neighborhood: Boerum Hill

Building Type: Condominium


Situated in a prime Brooklyn location, this luxury condominium was built to Passive House standards with extensive insulation, triple-glazed windows, an advanced solar hot water system, and individual energy recovery units. Its green approach extends to the amenities, which include an electric vehicle charging system in the enclosed parking garage.
158-Clifton-Place-01 158 Clifton Place via Paul A. Castrucci Architects

158 Clifton Place


Neighborhood: Clinton Hill

Building Type: Townhouse


158 Clifton Place is a wood frame house dating back to 1915; as a result, when the owners wished to gut-renovate it to Passive House standards, special consideration was required to air seal the building. The renovations included recycled materials and careful inspections to achieve Passive House certification, and a PV solar array brings it to near Net Zero energy capability.
285 Grand Street Blue Zees Real Estate LLC

285 Grand Street


Neighborhood: Williamsburg

Building Type: Condominium


285 Grand Street is a 15,000-square-foot project being developed by Blue Zees and Charles Street Capital. The ground-up 4-story luxury condominium will feature just two units and retail on the first floor. David Berridge Architect is listed as the architect of record. Sales launched in February 2020.
951-Pacific-Street-01 Rendering of R-951 via Paul A. Castrucci Architects

R-951 Residence, 951 Pacific Street


Neighborhood: Prospect Heights

Building Type: Condominium


R-951 Residence was New York City's first building to have both Passive House and Net Zero-Ready certifications. The design by Paul A. Castrucci Architects features a solar PV array, a rainwater harvesting system, and a south-facing facade with a dynamic building folding screen, which gives residents control over the solar gain in each home.
255-Columbia-Street-01 255 Columbia Street

255 Columbia Street


Neighborhood: Carroll Gardens

Building Type: Condominium


The 13-unit condominium at 255 Columbia Street is an early example of how Passive House design principles could be incorporated into multi-family buildings. The seven-story building was designed with an ultra-tight building envelope, an energy-recovering air ventilator system, rooftop solar panels, and two rooftop heat pumps. All units have open layouts, generous storage, and private outdoor space, not to mention air-to-air heat pumps and incredible light through the triple-glazed windows.
369-Manhattan-Avenue-1 Street Smart rendering via ZH Architects

Street Smart, 369 Manhattan Avenue


Neighborhood: Williamsburg



Building Type: Rental
Street Smart, which is taking shape on the former site of a parking lot will be Passive House certified and consume 90 percent less energy than a standard code-compliant building typically uses for heating and cooling. The “durable, low-maintenance” building will feature walls with highly-insulated, non-fossil-fuel-based mineral wool, triple-glazed windows optimized for passive solar gains, thermal bridge construction, and high-performance energy recovery ventilation (ERV), which uses to treat the building’s own exhaust energy to pre-heat and pre-cool incoming air from the HVAC system.
152-Freeman-Street-01 Haus via Loadingdock5

Haus, 152 Freeman Street


Neighborhood: Greenpoint

Building Type: Rental


Haus offers high beamed ceilings, private outdoor space for all units, and a common roof deck. But this Brooklyn building's most appealing feature is its Passive House infrastructure. The building envelope is constructed out of a one-sided insulating concrete form with all insulation on the exterior. Haus was designed to prove that a Passive House need not be a budget-busting endeavor, even in New York, and it has succeeded in that regard.
424-Melrose-Street-1 The Mennonite via Chris Benedict

The Mennonite, 424 Melrose Street


Neighborhood: Bushwick



Building Type: Rental
Developed in a joint venture with Ridgewood Bushwick Senior Citizens Council and the United Mennonite Church, this four-story, 24-unit building is wrapped in one of the most energy-efficient envelopes in New York City. It also features 16 thermal solar panels and two small boilers on the roof. According to Brownstoner, it uses only 10 percent of the energy of comparably sized buildings.
Chestnut Commons Rendering Dattner Architects

Chestnut Commons, 3269 Atlantic Avenue


Neighborhood: East New York

Building Type: Rental


Announced in late 2019, Chestnut Commons is a brand new all-affordable building coming to the underserved neighborhood of East New York. Along with 274 units, the new development will also have recreation & social services, a satellite campus for Kingsborough Community College, a performing arts center, a food incubator, and a 2,000-square-foot bank. Dattner Architects is tasked with designing Chestnut Commons to Passive House standards.
852 St. John's Place Rendering Zakrewski + Hyde Architects

852 St. Johns Place


Neighborhood: Crown Heights

Building Type: Condominium


Another project by Zakrewski + Hyde Architects, this Crown Heights 3-story rowhouse is getting a 2-story addition and 7 condo units - all for the same cost per square foot as a standard building. The new air-tight exterior boasts a modern aesthetic of expansive strip windows and dark cladding, and all units feature energy-efficient technology.
1875 Broadway Rendering Georgica Green Ventures

Our Lady of Lourdes Apartments, 1875 Broadway


Neighborhood: Bushwick

Building Type: Rental


Since 2012 there have been plans to redevelop Bushwick's former Our Lady of Lourdes convent into much-needed affordable and supportive housing. Nearly five years later, construction appears to have wound down and a lottery opened up for 63 new units at the site. It marks the first Passive House project for OCV Architects, whose design includes a total of three buildings (two new), and sustainable features like a rooftop photovoltaic panel system, energy efficient lighting, fixtures, and appliances.
803-Knickerbocker-Avenue-1 Knickerbocker Commons via New York Housing Conference

Knickerbocker Commons, 803 Knickerbocker Avenue


Neighborhood: Bushwick

Building Type: Rental


The six-story, 24-unit Knickerbocker Commons has the distinction of being New York's first affordable multi-family building to be built and designed to Passive House standards. Its environmentally friendly features include a sculpted EIFS facade that optimizes solar gain and shading, replacing the traditional heating system, and low-voltage equipment and water reuse that also decrease energy costs.

174 Grand Street


Neighborhood: Williamsburg

Building Type: Rental


174 Grand Street is one of Brooklyn's earliest examples of Passive House construction. The walls' 8" concrete masonry units with 6 inches of EPS exterior insulation, 8" rigid insulation windows, and exterior sun sail on the south facade were key parts of that endeavor. The mixed-use building is well situated near Bedford Avenue, which has become a hip shopping street, and brings a new trend to the area.
23-Park-Place-01 Tighthouse via FABRICA 718

Tighthouse, 23 Park Place


Neighborhood: Park Slope

Building Type: Townhouse


Following a renovation, this Park Slope townhouse dating back to 1899 has earned its new name of Tighthouse in all senses of the word. A new rear facade was added to close any gaps in the traditional masonry exterior, an internal staircase with glass panel volumes spreads natural light throughout the home, and a third-floor addition has an angled roof with solar thermal and photovoltaic panels. A heat map showed the stark difference between this townhouse's energy use and that of its neighbors, and it is little wonder this project was the winner of the 2014 International Passive House Design Award.
78-Third-Place-01 78 Third Place via John Muggenborg Photography

78 Third Place


Neighborhood: Carroll Gardens

Building Type: Townhouse


78 Third Place demonstrates that Passive House energy efficiency need not come at the expense of classic architecture. An Energy-Recovery Ventilation (ERV) system, high-performance doors, triple-glazed windows, and a solar canopy were incorporated with the utmost respect for historic details. The project earned the blessing of the Landmarks Preservation Commission and green building advocates alike.

THE BRONX:

448-East-143rd-Street-1 Rendering of 448 East 143rd Street via Breaking Ground

Betances V, 448 East 143rd Street


Neighborhood: Mott Haven

Building Type: Rental


Betances V is being designed by COOKFOX to reduce reliance on energy supplies. Upon completion, which is estimated for 2021, it will bring 149 studio through one-bedroom apartments for low-income seniors, as well as those who have experienced homelessness. Indoor and outdoor amenities will include library, common area, terrace garden, and on-site medical and psychiatric care.
425 Grand Concourse Rendering Dattner Architects

425 Grand Concourse


Neighborhood: Mott Haven

Building Type: Rental

This 300,000-square-foot development with 277 affordable apartments will use 30% of the energy of a traditional housing development. A highly insulated building envelope will provide the bulk of the energy savings, and it will be supplemented by a vegetated roof deck, solar shading, solar panels, cogen power generation, and an energy recovery system. Construction topped out at the beginning of 2021, and the latest pictures can be found here.
3365 Third Avenue Rendering Google Earth image of 3365 Third Avenue

3365 Third Avenue


Neighborhood: Morrisania

Building Type: Rental


3365 Third Avenue will comprise a community facility space and 30 apartments on floors 2-8. An affordable lottery took place in the summer of 2017 for the apartments, which will provide affordable housing across a wide income range (20-90% AMI) and meet Passive House standards. Energy-efficient measures include insulated concrete forms, an airtight building envelope, fiberglass triple-pane windows and energy recovery ventilators.
2950 Park Avenue Rendering Curtis + Ginsberg Architects

Park Avenue Green, 2950 Park Avenue


Neighborhood: Mott Haven

Building Type: Rental


Energy efficiency shouldn’t be a luxury amenity, a belief that informed Park Avenue Green. This affordable, 154-unit Bronx building will use several inches of insulation, a special ventilation system, and extra-thick windows to meet the standards of Passive House construction. It is the largest certified project to date, but several projects on this list are nipping at its heels and poised to overtake it.
97-West-169th-Street-01 Highbridge Vista rendering via Paul A. Castrucci Architects

Highbridge Vista, 97 West 169th Street


Neighborhood: Highbridge

Building Type: Rental


Highbridge Vista is a senior affordable, high-efficiency building offering raised gardening beds, clustered seating and ergonomic benches; well-lit, smooth walking surfaces, and age-friendly exercise equipment. The building features high-performance thermal insulation, rooftop solar panels, solar shading, high performance windows, and energy-efficient ventilation that will provide fresh air comfort and significant savings to residents. Additionally, the use of modular construction is intended to greatly reduce costs and reduce construction time by six months.
2519 Creston Avenue Magnusson Architecture and Planning

Creston Parkview, 2519 Creston Avenue


Neighborhood: Fordham

Building Type: Rental


Fordham, a neighborhood transitioning from industrial to residential, is seeing affordable housing in the form of a 12-story building dubbed "Creston Parkview." YIMBY revealed the project will include a 7,300-square-foot community center and 181 below-market rentals, ranging from studios to three-bedrooms. Eco-friendly features will include two green roofs, extra-thick windows, Energy Star appliances, LED lighting, water conserving fixtures, renewable building materials, and a high performance envelope. The lottery took place in fall 2019.
4697 Third Avenue Rendering Curtis + Ginsberg Architects

Cyrus House, 4697 Third Avenue


Neighborhood: Fordham

Building Type: Rental


Permits were filed in November 2018 for an 8-story, 53-unit mixed-use building to rise on a vacant parcel on the corner of East 188th Street. The project will be entirely affordable and meet Passive House standards by implementing rainwater harvesting, solar panels, and energy-efficient building materials, design, and appliances.
746 East 214th Street Aimir

746 East 214th Street


Neighborhood: Williamsbridge

Building Type: Rental


This ground-up development is the latest Passive House rental to hit the Bronx. Development firm Propco Holdings announced plans for a ground-up 4-story, 10-unit rental designed by Markel Architecture and constructed to meet Passive House standards.

QUEENS:

89-46-164th-Street-01 Tree of Life via Housing Connect

Tree of Life, 89-46 164th Street


Neighborhood: Jamaica

Building Type: Rental


A housing lottery is underway at Tree of Life, an affordable housing project constructed to Passive House standards. Features like increased insulation, high-performance windows, energy recovery ventilators, and high-efficiency variable refrigerant flow heating and cooling have resulted in a building that produces less carbon emissions and offers a more comfortable experience. Amenities include outdoor green space, bike room, and on-site parking with electric car charging stations.
19-19-Cornaga-Avenue-01 19-19 Cornaga Avenue via Paul A. Castrucci Architects

19-19 Cornaga Avenue


Neighborhood: Far Rockaway

Building Type: Rental


19-19 Cornaga Avenue is a 60/40 supportive housing building comprising 72 supportive housing units and 20 affordable housing units. The project is designed using Passive House methodology and features a high-efficiency building envelope and mechanical system, heat pumps and through-wall air conditioning, extensive green roofs, and LED lighting.
13-38-Central-Avenue-01 Rendering via Paul A. Castrucci Architects

Milton P. Browne Community Square, 13-38 Central Avenue


Neighborhood: Far Rockaway

Building Type: Rental


This nine-story Passive House building's thermal envelope, rooftop solar panels, fresh air energy recovery ventilation, and VOC- and asthmagen-free building materials will contribute to greater energy efficiency and higher quality of life. All 239 affordable units will enjoy excellent light and air, and come outfitted with high-efficiency electric appliances. In addition to the apartments, the project will offer a new school and community center as well as a new supermarket in the building's retail space.
Beach-Green-Dunes-01 Beach Green Dunes via Omni

Beach Green Dunes I and II


Neighborhood: Far Rockaway

Building Type: Rental


One block from the Atlantic Ocean, Beach Green Dunes I and II comprises 228 affordable units reserved for very-low-, low-, and moderate-income households. Innovations in construction include a progressive building envelope, a bio swale garden to treat and retain storm water, solar photovoltaics on the roof, and a geothermal heating/cooling system underground. An affordable lottery for the first phase received more than 50,000 applications for 100 apartments, and a lottery for the second phase took place in spring 2020.
45-12-11th-Street-01 45-12 11th Street via DNAinfo/Jeanmarie Evelly

Climate Change Row House, 45-12 11th Street


Neighborhood: Long Island City

Building Type: Townhouse


The Climate Change Row House is a prime example of how to come back from disaster stronger than before: A year after Superstorm Sandy struck, this townhouse just blocks from the waterfront was renovated with Passive House techniques that included triple-paned windows and twice the typical amount of insulation to prevent air from leaking in or out. All three floors were also raised above flood level.
93-01-Sutphin-Boulevard-1 Rendering of The Crossing at Jamaica Station via FXCollaborative

The Crossing at Jamaica Station, 93-01 Sutphin Boulevard


Neighborhood: Jamaica

Building Type: Rental


This mixed-use development is conveniently located directly across from Jamaica Terminal. Its easy access to public transportation will surely be taken into consideration for LEED Silver certification, as will its construction to Passive House standards, on-site cogeneration plant, water-saving plumbing systems, and green roofs. The groundbreaking took place in the spring of 2017, and completion is estimated for 2020.
54-25 101st Street Rendering Think Architecture and Design

HANAC Senior Residence, 54-15 101st Street


Neighborhood: Corona

Building Type: Rental


In spring 2019, U.S. Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Queens District Attorney Melinda Katz were on hand to celebrate the opening of the first affordable senior housing development built to Passive House standards. The eight-story building includes a pre-K, backyard, community rooms, garden, green roof, and services of an on-site social worker.
38-42-12th-Street-01 Rendering of The Oasis via Archimaera

The Oasis, 38-42 12 Street


Neighborhood: Long Island City

Building Type: Commercial


The coronavirus pandemic has many designers rethinking office space, but none to the extent of The Oasis: At 425,000 square feet and 11 stories, it is set to be the largest speculative Passive House office development in the United States. Sustainable features will include a super-insulated building exterior, triple-glazed windows, LED lighting, solar panels, and a green roof. Not only is Passive House construction good for the environment and the wallet (in the form of lower energy bills), but its high-efficiency ventilation system is also good for bringing in outside fresh air. Renderings show the project organized around a center courtyard, and there will be over 30,000 square feet of terraces and outdoor space. Groundbreaking is anticipated for the third quarter of 2021, and completion is estimated for the fourth quarter of 2022.

NEW JERSEY GOLD COAST:

1024-Adams-Street-01 Rendering of Candela Lofts via Bijou Properties

Candela Lofts, 1024 Adams Street


Neighborhood: Hoboken

Building Type: Condominium


When a candelabra factory in Hoboken was converted to luxury condos, the developers incorporated high-quality insulation, an air-sealed building envelope, a dedicated ventilation unit for filtered fresh air, and triple-glazed windows into the conversion. Candela Lofts is New Jersey's first multi-family Passive House, and we hope it is the first of many. The demand is clearly there - only two units are neither sold nor under contract. Prices start at $1.499 million.

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